Driving Tips, Chilean Style (Manejar, a la chilena)

The topic is drivingagain… But this time it’s not my opinion, but rather a tongue-in-cheek look at Chilean driving styles written by Chilean journalist Marcela Recabarren and translated from the February 7, 2009 edition of Paula magazine (page 81). It’s always interesting to have some insight into what Chileans think about themselves.

Nuevamente el tema se trata de los modos de conducir de los chilenos, pero esta vez no es opinión mía. Se trata de unas observaciones de la periodista Marcela Recabarren, publicadas en la revista Paula. Ver la versión original en el primer comentario abajo.

Driving behaviors that show just how far we are from living a civilized lifestyle:
1. You’re in a traffic jam and someone signals that they want to change lanes.
Reaction: you speed up so they can’t move in.

2. The driver in front of you lets another car slide in ahead of him.
Reaction: you blow your horn in protest against the nerd that lets others cut ahead.

3. Now you try to change lanes, but no one lets you in.
Reaction: you swear at the idiots who won’t let you in, although they can’t hear you because your window is rolled up.

4. You see a car with a “Student Driver” sign.
Reaction: you speed past with your foot to the floor so that she understands how to really drive.

5. A pedestrian attempts to cross the street at a crosswalk and no one lets him pass.
Reaction: you stop and let them cross, just to make yourself feel good. The effect last all day, although you continue to practically run over every other pedestrian you see.

4 responses to “Driving Tips, Chilean Style (Manejar, a la chilena)

  1. La Gringa/Margaret

    5 conductas al volante que demuestran lo lejos que estamos de la convivencia civilizada:

    1. Estás en un taco y alguien señaliza para cambiarse a tu carril.
    Reacción: aceleras para no dejarlo pasar.

    2. El chofer de adelante deja pasar a un auto.
    Reacción: Tocas la bocina para protestar contra el nerd que deja se le cuele.

    3. Ahora tú intentas cambiarte de carril, pero nadie te da la pasada.
    Reacción: garabateas a los idiotas que no te dejan pasar, aunque no te escuchen, porque llevas el vidrio cerrado.

    4. Un auto con letrero de “en práctica” va a la vuelta de la rueda.
    Reacción: lo adelantas aserruchando a fondo para que cache cómo se maneje de verdad.

    5. Un peatón intenta cruzar por un paso de cebra y ningún auto lo0 deja pasar.
    Reacción: te detienes y le das la pasada, solo para sentirte bien contigo mismo. El efecto te dura el día entero, aunque sigas tirándole el auto encima al resto del mundo.

    Fuente: Marcela Recabarren, en la revista Paula del 7 de febrero del 2009 (pág 81).

  2. Pingback: The Left Lane is MINE « Cachando Chile: Reflections on Chilean Culture

  3. my god, that’s all so true. i was talking about this with a chilean friend just last month and every single point came up.

    the worst thing is that i now do all those things when i drive here. I wouldn’t even consider driving like i do here in England. Looking on the positive side, of course, it means I’ve fully adapted to my adopted country🙂

  4. La Gringa/Margaret

    Scary how we tend to adapt, isn’t it? Everytime I go back to the States I have to remember to change driving styles completely!
    I remember the first time I dared do that trick where you turn a 2-lane road into a 3 lane by passing down the middle and just “knowing” that the other cars are just going to move over and let you get away with it. I was so proud of myself and said “Look! I’m driving like a Chilean!” My very astute daughter said, “No you’re not, a Chilean wouldn’t even notice there was anything to comment on!” (Just another day on the road!)

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